Web Programmers Look to Cloud Computing for Coming Hiring Frenzy

Web Programmers Look to Cloud Computing for Coming Hiring FrenzyWhen major companies like SAP and Oracle start snapping up cloud computing companies in multi-billion dollar acquisitions, it’s a pretty good indication that a market trend is on the verge of materializing.

SAP paid $3.4 billion for SuccessFactors, a major player in the newly emerged cloud computing industry. Oracle bought a similar company named RightNow.

The fact that these huge corporations are paying mega-bucks in acquisitions proves what research analysts have been claiming for quite some time now: Cloud computing is going to be the next in-demand genre of web design, development, and programming.

While acquisitions certainly substantiate the idea of a steep incline in the demand for specialized web programmers, there are many other indications that support the analyst’s theories. UBM TechWeb is hosting a Cloud Connect conference in 2012 to focus on making cloud computing a real option for existing and developing businesses.

Among the conference tracks, keynote speakers from Google, BitCurrent, Nebula, Cisco, and more will be there to discuss the specifics of cloud computing and the potential benefits to small and large benefits.

The cloud computing industry’s recent push toward making businesses more aware of the benefits of cloud computing is paying off for all echelons of web development throughout the world-wide IT community. In short, the added effort to market directly to businesses is working. Twilio, a San Francisco-based communications company has already implemented cloud technology for its users. Twilio recently secured $17 million from investors for cloud support.

The company claims that most of that funding will be used for aggressively hiring to support its four-fold growth in the last year which will include many web developers and programmers. The company now supports more than 70,000 web developers to implement, manage, and maintain cloud communication services and there is no limit to their potential growth.

Twilio’s biggest competitor in cloud communications is Skype, but that hasn’t stopped investors from padding the company’s funding up to $32 million for continued support.

As long as the hype continues, careers in web development will flourish and are likely to experience phenomenal growth over the next twenty-four months. Web programmers with education specific to cloud security, cloud data processing applications, cloud web design and programming for mobile phones and secure private clouds will see a huge jump in the demand for qualified candidates in their chosen career path.