Web Design Students Help Build Aquarium Website

A group of web design students from University of South Florida recently helped to build a website for an aquarium in Florida that attracts thousands of visitors each year.

Community projects are routinely injected into web design school curriculums to help students learn about project management and customer requests.

The web design school at University of South Florida lent their skilled students to The Florida Aquarium to help design a website highlighting the features and goals of the non-profit organization that focuses on conservation and education. The Florida Aquarium resides in Tampa and features thousands of animals.

A web design competition was hosted at the school, where students drew up graphic designs and marketing materials to help the organization better market its image on the internet. The Florida Aquarium then chose a web design company to implement student designs and fine-tune the flow of the site to include easier navigation and search modules that were user friendly.

These web design students created design elements based on their training at the University of South Florida, which offers an in-depth curriculum to students. The web design school is offering a certificate in web design as part of their instructional technology program and completing the certificate can be applied to the students’ degree program.

Community partnerships such as these also allow the students at web design schools to interact with professional web design agencies that may offer them internship opportunities in the future. Web design is typically nested into a broad spectrum technology program at schools, where students may also learn to specialize in a specific component of internet and web-based technology.

Many students go on to become web masters or administrators, while others choose to focus on web design languages and programming. The art of web design is a broad spectrum of skills that are most beneficial at a specialist’s level, leaving many opportunities for graduates.